The spin system

The central concept for spectral simulations with EasySpin is the spin system. It collects all information about the spins in the sample and how they are coupled. In EasySpin, a spin system is represented by a MATLAB structure (the spin system structure) that contains a series of fields holding this information.

The spin system structure contains all information about the spin system and its spin Hamiltonian. Its fields specify spin quantum numbers, interaction parameters, matrices and tensors, relative orientation angles for these matrices and tensors as well as details about broadenings.

The spin Hamiltonian is set up in frequency units (MHz, not angular frequencies), so all the energy parameters of the Hamiltonian have to be given in MHz as well. Hence, for example, the field A represents in fact the diagonal of the hyperfine coupling tensor divided by the Planck constant, A/h, and not of A. Remember that all angles are in radians, not in degrees.

Spin system structures are used by many EasySpin functions, among them the simulation functions chili (slow-motion EPR), garlic (isotropic EPR), pepper (solid-state EPR), salt (ENDOR), and saffron (pulse EPR).

A few examples

Before we give a full list of possible fields, here are a couple of examples of spin system definitions. There are two equivalent ways.

Sys.S = 1/2;
Sys.g = [1.9 2.0 2.1];
Sys.lw = 0.7;            % mT
Sys = struct('S',1/2,'g',[1.9 2.0 2.1],'lw',0.7);

Nuclei can be added to a spin system either using a set of fields (Nucs, A) or using the function nucspinadd.

Sys.S = 1/2;
Sys.g = [2 2.1 2.2];
Sys.Nucs = '63Cu';
Sys.A = [50 50 460];  % MHz
It is more convenient to use nucspinadd:
Sys = struct('S',1/2,'g',[2 2.1 2.2]);
Sys = nucspinadd(Sys,'63Cu',[50 50 460]);

A high-spin Mn2+ system with zero-field splitting is

Sys = struct('S',5/2,'g',2,'Nucs','55Mn');
Sys.A = -240;   % MHz
Sys.D = 120;    % MHz
Spin system parameters

The following groups of parameters can be specified in the spin system structure:

All interaction matrices and tensors can have arbitrary orientations with respect to a molecule-fixed frame of reference (the so-called molecular frame).

Below we list and describe all possible spin system structure fields containing spin Hamiltonian parameters.

The spins

The two fields S and Nucs are used to specify the electron and nuclear spins constituting the spin system. Both are optional. If S is not given, S=1/2 is assumed. If Nucs is not specified, Nucs='' is used.

S
Gives the electron spin quantum number(s). An arbitrary number of electron spins can be specified. Examples:
Sys.S = 1/2;            % one electron spin with S=1/2
Sys.S = 5/2;            % an S=5/2 spin
Sys.S = [1/2, 1/2];     % two S=1/2 spins
Sys.S = [1, 1, 1/2];    % two S=1 spins and one S=1/2 spin

If S is not given, it is automatically set to 1/2.

Nucs
A string containing a comma-separated list of nuclear isotopes specifying the nuclear spins in the spin system. An arbitrary number of nuclei can be specified.
Sys.Nucs = '1H';              % one hydrogen
Sys.Nucs = '63Cu';            % a 63Cu nucleus
Sys.Nucs = '59Co,14N,14N';    % a 59Co and two 14N nuclei

If there are no nuclear spins in the system, don't specify this field or set it to '' (an empty string). Nuclei can be added and removed one at a time using nucspinadd and nucspinrmv.

If not a single isotope, but a natural-abundance mixture of isotopes is needed, just omit the mass number. You can also freely mix single isotopes and natural-abundance mixtures in one spin system.

Sys.Nucs = 'Cu';          % natural-abundance mixture of 69% 63Cu and 31% 65Cu
Sys.Nucs = 'Cu,14N';      % same as above, plus a pure 14N
Sys.Nucs = 'F,C';         % 100% 19F, plus a mixture of 99% 12C and 1% 13C

EasySpin will automatically simulate the spectra of all possible isotopologues (isotopes combinations) and combine them with the appropriate weights. Hyperfine constants and quadrupole couplings are automatically converted between isotopes. The values given by you in the spin system are taken to apply for the most abundant isotope with an appropriate spin (e.g. 63Cu in the case of Cu, 1H for H, 14N of N, 119Sn for Sn).

It is also possible to give custom/enriched isotope mixtures by explicitly giving a list of the mass numbers of all isotopes in parentheses in Nucs. Additionally, the abundances should be given in Abund. In the simplest case of one atom, this would be

Sys.Nucs = '(12,13)C';     % for a mixture of 12C and 13C
Sys.Abund = [0.3 0.7];     % 30% of 12C, the rest 13C

Sys.Nucs = '(1,2)H';       % for a mixture of protons and deuterons
Sys.Abund = [0.05 0.95];   % 95% deuterium

In the case of multiple atoms, Abund should be a cell array with a list of abundances for each atom. For example

Sys.Nucs = '63Cu,(32,33)S';    % 63Cu with enriched 33S
Sys.Abund = {1,[0.1,0.9]];     % 100% 63Cu, 10% 32S and 90% 33S

Custom and natural abundance mixtures and single isotopes can be all used at the same time. Any entry for a natural-abundance atom or for a single isotope in Abund is ignored.

Sys.Nucs = 'Cu,(32,33)S,1H'; % natural Cu with enriched 33S and a pure 1H
Sys.Abund = {1,[0.1,0.9],1}; % one way
Sys.Abund = {[],[0.1,0.9],[]}; % another way, yieldig the same result
Abund
Specify abundances for custom isotope mixtures. See Nucs above.
n
Vector of number of equivalent nuclei, e.g.
Sys.Nucs = '1H,13C';  % one class of 1H and one class of 13C
Sys.n = [2 3];        % 2 protons and 3 carbon-13 spins
Sys.n can be omitted if all nuclei in Sys.Nucs occur only once.

Important: pepper does currently not support Sys.n. If you have multiple equivalent nuclei, you have to enter each separately.

The g values

The g matrices/tensors for all electron spins in the system are supplied in two fields:

See also the reference page on the Electron Zeeman interaction.

g
Depending on whether the g tensors are rhombic, axial or isotropic, there are different ways you can input the principal values:

When the principal values of g are given in g, the orientation of the g tensor can be specified by Euler angles in gFrame, see below.

As an alternative, it is also possible to give the full 3x3 g tensor in g. For example

% full g tensor for one electron spin
Sys.g = [ 2.003397   -0.000431   -0.000004;...
         -0.000416    2.003032   -0.000006;...
         -0.000014    0.000013    2.002237];

% full g tensors for two electron spins
Sys.g = [2 0 0; 0 2 0; 0 0 2; 2.1 0 0; 0 2.1 0, 0 0 2.1];

If you give full g tensors, the Euler angles in gFrame are ignored.

gFrame
Each row of this array specifies the orientation of the g tensor frame in the molecular frame (see the page on frames). Each row contains the three Euler angles (in radians) for the rotation that transforms the molecular frame to the g tensor frame. If not specified, gFrame is assumed to be all-zero, that is, the g tensors of all electron spins are aligned with the molecular frame.
Sys.gFrame = [0 10 0]*pi/180;                % one electron spin
Sys.gFrame = [0 10 0; 23 -45 67]*pi/180;     % two electron spins
Sys.gFrame = [0 0 0; 0 pi/4 0; 0 -pi/4 0];   % three electron spins

With these angles, EasySpin can transform a g tensor from its diagonal eigenframe representation to the molecular frame representation. Here is an explicit example how this is done:

gpv = [2.1 1.97 2.04];       % principal values
gFrame = [10 34 -2]*pi/180;  % Euler angles, in radians

R_M2g = erot(gFrame)         % transformation matrix
g_g = diag(gpv)              % g in the g frame
g_M = R_M2g.'*g_g*R_M2g      % g in molecular frame

which gives the following output

R_M2g =
    0.8220    0.1095   -0.5589
   -0.1450    0.9892   -0.0195
    0.5507    0.0971    0.8290
g_g =
    2.1000         0         0
         0    1.9700         0
         0         0    2.0400
g_M =
    2.0791    0.0154   -0.0278
    0.0154    1.9722   -0.0023
   -0.0278   -0.0023    2.0587

The rows of the transformation matrix R_M2g correspond to the g tensor principal axes in molecular frame coordinates. The columns, on the other hand, correspond to the molecular axes in g frame coordinates. See the page on frames for more details.

If a 3x3 transformation matrix Rg is given, e.g. from literature, then the corresponding Euler angles can be obtained by

gFrame = eulang(Rg);
gpa
This was the way of specifying Euler angles prior to EasySpin 5 and has been superseded by gFrame. To convert old gpa values to gFrame, invert the order and flip the sign of the three Euler angles.
gpa =    [34  78 -12]*pi/180;    % old form, obsolete
gFrame = [12 -78 -34]*pi/180;    % new form
 
Hyperfine couplings

For each electron-nucleus pair, a hyperfine coupling tensor can be specified. The following fields are used.

A
Principal values of the hyperfine interaction matrices A/h, in MHz. Each row contains the principal values of the A tensors of one nucleus. A(k,:) refers to nuclear spin k. The orientations of the A matrices are given in AFrame.
Sys.A = [-6 12 23];            % 1 electron and 1 nucleus
Sys.A = [10 10 -20; 30 40 50]; % 1 electron and 2 nuclei

For axial and isotropic hyperfine tensors, the notation can be shortened, just as in the case of the g tensor.

Sys.A = [4 10];       % = [4 4 10]  (axial, 1 electron and 1 nucleus)
Sys.A = 34;           % = [34 34 34] (isotropic, 1 electron and 1 nucleus)
Sys.A = [4 10; 1 2];  % = [4 4 10; 1 1 2]  (axial, 1 electron and 2 nucleui)
Sys.A = [7; 3];        % = [7 7 7; 3 3 3] (isotropic, 1 electron and 2 nuclei)

If the system contains more than one electron spin, each row contains the principal values of the hyperfine couplings to all electron spins, listed one after the other.

Sys.A = [10 10 -20 30 40 50];                % 2 electrons and 1 nucleus
Sys.A = [10 10 -20 30 40 50; 1 1 -2 3 4 5];  % 2 electrons and 2 nuclei

It is possible to specify full A matrices in A. The 3x3 matrices have to be combined like the 1x3 vectors used when only principal values are defined: For different electrons, put the 3x3 matrices side by side, for different nuclei, on top of each other. If full matrices are given in A, AFrame is ignored.

Sys.A = [5 0 0; 0 5 0; 0 0 5]                          % 1 electron and 1 nucleus
Sys.A = [[5 0 0; 0 5 0; 0 0 5]; [10 0 0; 0 10 0; 0 0 10]]     % 1 electron and 2 nuclei
Sys.A = [[5 0 0; 0 5 0; 0 0 5], [10 0 0; 0 10 0; 0 0 10]]     % 2 electrons and 1 nucleus
A_
Spherical form of the hyperfine matrix, in terms of its isotropic, axial and rhombic components. The units are MHz. A and A_ cannot be used at the same time.
Sys.A_ = 2;         % isotropic component only
Sys.A_ = [2 3]      % isotropic and axial component
Sys.A_ = [2 3 0.4]  % isotropic, axial and rhombic component
The cartesian form (as used in A) and the spherical form (as used in A_) are related by
% spherical -> cartesian
A(1) = A_(1)-A_(2)-A_(3);
A(2) = A_(1)-A_(2)+A_(3);
A(3) = A_(1)+2*A_(2)

% cartesian -> spherical
A_(1) = mean(A);
A_(2) = (2*A(3)-A(1)-A(2))/6;
A_(3) = (-A(1)+A(2))/2;
or if you prefer more compact notation
A = A_*[1 1 1; -1 -1 2; -1 +1 0];   % spherical -> cartesian
A_ = A*[2 -1 -3; 2 -1 3; 2 2 0]/6;  % cartesian -> spherical
For more than one nucleus and more than one electron spin, the array structure is analogous to A.
AFrame
Array of Euler angles giving the orientations of the various A matrices in the molecular frame, as described above for gFrame. If AFrame is not specified, it is assumed to be all-zero, that is, all tensors are aligned with the molecular frame. See also erot. Each row of AFrame contains the three Euler angles for one nucleus.
Sys.AFrame = [0 20 0]*pi/180;  % one electron spin, one nucleus
Sys.AFrame = [0 0 0; 0 10 90; 12 -30 34]*pi/180 % one electron spin, three nuclei

If there are two or more electron spins, each nucleus has two or more hyperfine tensors, and consequently each row should contain two or more sets of Euler angles.

Sys.AFrame = [0 20 0, 13 -30 80]*pi/180;               % 2 electrons, 1 nucleus
Sys.AFrame = [0 20 0, 0 0 0; 0 10 0, 0 30 50]*pi/180;  % 2 electrons, 2 nuclei

Here is how principal values and angles can be converted to a full matrix:

Apv = [4 9 13];                   % principal values, MHz
AFrame = [10 45 -30]*pi/180;      % Euler angles
A_A = diag(Apv);                  % full matrix in A frame
R = erot(AFrame);                 % transformation matrix
A_M = R.'*A_A*R;                  % full matrix in molecular frame

See the page on frames for more details.

 
Nuclear quadrupole couplings

For each nucleus spin, a nuclear quadrupole coupling tensor Q can be given, using the fields Q (for the parameters e2qQ/h and η, the principal values, or the full matrix) and QFrame (for the orientation).

Q
Array containing the quadrupole tensors Q/h for all nuclei, in MHz. There are several possible ways to specify the tensors. Here is an example of how to convert from e2Qq/h and η to the three principal Q values:
eeQqh = 1;     % MHz
eta = 0.2;     % unitless
I = 1;         % nuclear spin must be known!
Q = eeQqh/(4*I*(2*I-1)) * [-1+eta, -1-eta, 2]

See also the reference page on the nuclear quadrupole interaction.

QFrame
Euler angles (in radians) describing the orientations of the Q tensors in the molecular frame, analogous to gFrame and AFrame. QFrame should include one row of three angles for each nucleus. The angles are in units of radians, not degrees.

Sys.QFrame = [0 pi/4 0];                    % one nucleus
Sys.QFrame = [30 45 0; 10 -30 0]*pi/180;    % two nuclei

Here is how principal values and angles can be converted to a full matrix:

Qpv = [-0.9 -1.1 2]*0.125;        % principal values, MHz
QFrame = [10 45 -30]*pi/180;      % Euler angles
R = erot(QFrame);                 % transformation matrix
Q_Q = diag(Qpv);                  % full matrix in Q frame
Q_M = R.'*Q_Q*R;                  % full matrix in molecular frame

See the page on frames for more details.

 
Zero-field splittings

For each electron spin, a zero-field splitting can be specified in the fields D and DFrame. See also the reference page on the zero-field interaction.

D
D gives the zero-field splitting tensors for the electron spins in the spin system. It should be in units of MHz (1 cm-1 = 29979 MHz). It can be specified in several different ways.

Include zeros for any electron spin with S = 1/2.

DFrame
nx3 array of Euler angles describing the orientation of the D tensors, completely analogous to gFrame and QFrame. If absent, it is assumed to be all zeros.

Internally, EasySpin uses the following procedure to compute the full D tensor in the molecular frame from the given principal values and the Euler angles

Dvals = [-25 -55 80];        % principal values
DFrame = [10 20 0]*pi/180;   % tilt angles
D_D = diag(Dvals);           % full D tensor in its eigenframe

R = erot(DFrame);            % rotation matrix
D_M = R.'*diag(Dvals)*R;     % full D tensor in molecular frame

See the page on frames for more details.

 
High-order zero-field splittings

EasySpin supports a series of high-order electron spin operators in the spin Hamiltonian.

aF
Values, in MHz, of the fourth-order parameters a and F used in cubic systems of S=5/2 ions like Fe(III) and Mn(II). For their definition, see the reference page on high-order operators.
Sys.aF = [10 -3];   % in MHz

The operators of both a and F are defined in terms the molecular reference frame, which is assumed to coincide the four-fold symmetry axes of the cubic system.

This can be changed by setting Sys.aFFrame. If Sys.aFFrame=3, the operator corresponding to a is calculated assuming the reference system coincides with a three-fold symmetry axis of the cubic system. By default, Sys.aFFrame=4. As an alternative to aF, e.g. for different orientations of the reference frame, the more general high-order parameters B4 can be used (see below).

B0, B2, B4, B6, B8, B10, B12
The coefficients B(k,q) for the extended Stevens operators of the electron spin (see also the function stev). All coefficients should be real, and are understood in units of MHz. The number in the field name indicates the order k of the operator. E.g. B2 is for k = 2, and B4 is k = 4. If any of these fields is not given, it is treated as zero.

Each field that is given should contain a row vector of 2k+1 parameters, in order of decreasing q, running from +k to -k. For example:

Sys.B2 = [0 0 560 0 0];          % B(2,q) with q = +2,+1,0,-1,-2
Sys.B4 = [0 132 0 0 0 0 0 0 0];  % B(4,q) with q = +4,+3,+2,+1,0,-1,-2,-3,-4
The only nonzero elements in the above examples are therefore B(2,0) and B(4,+3).

In the common case that only the q=0 element is needed for a given k, it can be given alone in an abbreviated syntax valid for any k.

Sys.B2 = [0 0 99 0 0];  % B(2,0) only, full form
Sys.B2 = 99;            % equivalent abbreviated form

Sys.B4 = [0 0 0 0 -8700 0 0 0 0];  % B(4,0) only, full form
Sys.B4 = -8700;                    % equivalent abbreviated form

If more than one electron spin is present, specify one row of 2k+1 elements for each electron spin. The first row is for the first electron spin, etc.

Sys.S = [5/2 2];     % two spins
B20a = 100;          % for the first spin
B20b = -98;          % for the second spin
Sys.B2 = [0 0 B20a 0 0; 0 0 B20b 0 0]; % two rows: one row per spin
Sys.B2 = [B20a; B20b];                 % abbreviated form for two spins: two rows as well

Currently, it is not possible to include tilt angles for the principal frames of these high-order interaction tensors. All of them are assumed to be collinear with the molecular frame. By changing the molecular frame, i.e. by tilting all other tensors (g, A, etc), this limitation can be partially circumvented. Still, all the high-order interactions are collinear. Alternatively, you can use wignerd to compute a Wigner rotation matrix that can be used to tilt the tensors explicitly.

angles = rand(1,3)*pi;   % Euler tilt angles, in radians
B2 = [3 4 5 0 2];        % B(2,q) tensor components
R = wignerd(2,angles);   % rotation matrix for rank-2 tensor
B2 = R*B2;               % rotated tensor
Sys.B2 = B2.';
Electron-electron spin-spin couplings

For each pair of electron spins, a bilinear coupling matrix (composed of isotropic, anisotropic, and antisymmetric terms) can be given. You can enter it in one of two ways:

In addition, it is also possible to specify an isotropic biquadratic exchange coupling for each electron spin pair in Sys.ee2. This is not very common.

J
1xN array of real

List of isotropic exchange coupling constants (in MHz), one for each pair of electron spins. The associated spin Hamiltonian is +J S1S2 (not -2J S1S2). Here is an example for a two-spin system:

Sys.S = [3/2 3/2];  % two electron spins
Sys.J = J12;        % coupling constant, in MHz

For more than two spins, the pairs are ordered lexicographically, for example for a 4-spin system 1-2, 1-3, 1-4, 2-3, 2-4, 3-4.

Sys.S = [1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2];          % four spins
Sys.J = [J12 J13 J14 J23 J24 J34];  % six coupling constants, in MHz

To convert from the more traditional unit cm-1 to MHz, use

J_MHz = J_cm*30e3;            % cm^-1 to MHz conversion, approximate
J_MHz = J_cm*100*clight/1e6;  % cm^-1 to MHz conversion, exact

You can use either Sys.J (together with Sys.dvec and Sys.eeD if needed) or Sys.ee (with Sys.eeFrame), but not both at the same time.

dvec
Nx3 array of real

List of vectors (one per row, in units of MHz) that describe the antisymmetric part of the coupling between two electron spins (Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction). The associated spin Hamiltonian is d12.(S1xS2), where d12 is the interaction vector.

Sys.S = [1/2 1/2];    % two spins
d12 = [dx dy dz];     % units: MHz
Sys.dvec = d12;       % one interaction vector

For more than two spins, the vectors are ordered in lexicographic order, for example 1-2, 1-3, 2-3 for a three-spin system.

Sys.S = [1 1 1];        % three spins
d12 = [0 0 1.4e4];      % units: MHz
d23 = [0 0 2.1e4];
d13 = [0 0 3.7e4];
Sys.J = [d12;d13;d23];  % three interaction vectors, one per row

You can use either Sys.J (together with Sys.dvec and Sys.eeD if needed) or Sys.ee (with Sys.eeFrame), but not both at the same time.

eeD
Nx3 array of real

List of vectors (one per row, in units of MHz) that describe the symmetric part of the coupling between two electron spins (dipolar interaction). Each row contains the three principal values of the symmetric interaction tensor. Their sum has to give zero (i.e. the tensor has to be traceless).

Sys.S = [1 3/2];           % two spins
Sys.eeD = [-1 -1 2]*140;   % principal value of dipolar coupling tensor, MHz

For more than two spins, the vectors are ordered in lexicographic order, for example 1-2, 1-3, 2-3 for a three-spin system.

Sys.S = [3/2 3/2 3/2];    % three spins
D12 = [-1 -1 2]*1.4e4;    % units: MHz
D23 = [-1 -1 2]*2.1e4;
D13 = [-1 -1 2]*3.7e4;
Sys.J = [D12; D13; D23];  % three tensors

You can use either Sys.J (together with Sys.dvec and Sys.eeD if needed) or Sys.ee (with Sys.eeFrame), but not both at the same time.

ee
Nx3 or 3Nx3 array of real

Principal value of the electron-electron interaction matrices, in MHz. Each row corresponds to the diagonal of an interaction matrix (in its eigenframe). For two electron spins, ee contains one row only.

Sys.S = [1/2 1/2];     % two electron spins
Sys.ee = [50 50 100];  % principal values of one coupling matrix, MHz

For more than two electron spins, the pairs are lexicographically ordered according to the indices of the electron spins involved. If n is the number of electron spins, there are N = n(n-1)/2 rows. For example, for 4 spins there are 6 rows with the principal values for the interaction of spins 1-2, 1-3, 1-4, 2-3, 2-4, 3-4, in this order.

Sys.S = [1/2 1/2 1/2];        % three spins
ee12 = [50 50 100];
ee13 = [10 10 -30];
ee14 = [10 10 -30];
ee23 = [0 0 0];
ee24 = [0 0 0];
ee34 = [80 80 80];
Sys.ee = [ee12; ee13; ee14; ee23; ee24; ee34];  % 6 coupling matrices, MHz

If only isotropic couplings are needed, use Sys.J (see above).

It is also possible to specify the full 3x3 interaction matrices instead of the 3 principal values and 3 Euler angles. These matrices combine the isotropic, antisymmetric and symmetric parts of the interaction. For a 2-electron system, ee is a single 3x3 array.

Sys.S = [1/2 1/2];                   % two spins
Sys.ee = [50 0 0;0 50 0; 0 0 100];   % one coupling matrix, MHz

For more electrons, the 3x3 matrices are stacked on top of each other, to give a 3Nx3 array.

Sys.S = [1/2 1/2 1/2];                   % three spins
ee12 = [50 0 0; 0 50 0; 0 0 100];
ee13 = diag([10 10 -30]);
ee23 = zeros(3);
Sys.ee = [ee12; ee13; ee23];             % three coupling matrices

Note that you can use either Sys.ee (together with Sys.eeFrame) or Sys.J (together with Sys.dvec and Sys.eeD if needed), but not both at the same time.

eeFrame
Nx3 array containing the Euler angles describing the orientation of the electron-electron interaction matrices (specified in ee) in the molecular frame. Each row contains the Euler angles for the corresponding row in ee.

This is fully analogous to AFrame (see above). Check out the page on frames for more details on frames.

ee2
Contains the isotropic biquadratic exchange coupling, in MHz, for each pair of electron spins. The spin pairs are ordered as in ee.
Sys.S = [3/2 3/2];          % two electron spins
Sys.ee2 = 130;              % one biquadratic coupling 1-2

Sys.S = [3/2 3/2 3/2];      % three electron spins
Sys.ee2 = [130 150 190];    % couplings 1-2, 1-3, 2-3

Sys.S = [1 1 1 1];               % four electron spins
Sys.ee2 = [130 0 130 130 0 130]; % couplings 1-2, 1-3, 1-4, 2-3, 2-4, 3-4

EasySpin defines the biquadratic exchange term in the spin Hamiltonian as +j(S1.S2)2, with a plus sign. In the literature, it is sometimes defined with a negative sign, so be careful when using literature values.

 
Line broadenings and strains

There is a number of fields by which line broadenings can be specified. lw and lwEndor are line widths (FWHM) which are used for convolution of the simulated spectrum. All others are so-called strains and describe Gaussian distributions in the associated spin Hamiltonian parameters.

For a full documentation of the line broadening fields in the spin system structure, see the page on line broadenings.